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What is the most valuable signature?



What is the most valuable signature?


There are plenty of people who have signed their name in ink over the years, but some names really stand out from the crowd. Whether they're well-known or obscure, there are several legendary signatures that you probably recognize even if you've never seen them written down before.

Let's start with one of history's greatest authors — William Shakespeare. He was known for his prolific writing output, which included plays like "Romeo & Juliet" and "Hamlet." To keep up, he'd sign each new manuscript by hand. A quick scan through any book will reveal dozens upon dozens of examples of this iconic author signing his work. And while it may seem as though all of those signatures would be equally valuable, not every autograph has equal monetary value. Some are simply collector items rather than collectibles. But what about famous signatures that aren't just scribbles on paper? What makes a particular signature so special? Here we'll explore some of the world's most valuable signatures and how they compare to other types of popular memorabilia.

What is the rarest signature?

The oldest surviving document bearing someone's signature dates back to 1285 C.E., when King Edward I used the royal seal to authenticate letters sent between himself and Pope Clement IV. The earliest handwritten letter appears to date back further still, to 1145 C.E. These documents were created during times where no digital technology existed and could only be verified via pen and parchment. So it should come as little surprise that many of the first signatures ever recorded today consist entirely of illegible scrawls. In fact, many early European signatures were drawn using abbreviations instead of full names (e.g. MELITOFT). As time went on, however, scholars began developing new ways to accurately record signatures. By the 15th century, for instance, artists had begun adding small details like hairline strokes to distinguish individuals' unique handwriting styles.

But although signatures became significantly easier to read, they didn't stop evolving. Many professional signatures changed drastically throughout the centuries because certain languages evolved into different alphabets. For example, French writer Victor Hugo's cursive script gradually morphed into something resembling modern calligraphy. Similarly, Samuel Taylor Coleridge's signature transformed from flowing italics into an ornate script he called Koyrkis. Other notable writers also made significant changes to their signatures over time. Edgar Allan Poe added flourishes like feathers, claws, and skulls at various points, whereas Mark Twain started off writing his own name in block printing and eventually switched to stencils. It seems almost impossible that anyone would want to try copying such intricate works nowadays.

Other factors can make a signature desirable too. Take Henry VIII's "imperial style," for example, which consisted of extravagant flourish strokes that resemble Latin characters. This signature is considered priceless due to its rarity and high level of legibility. However, many other signatures change dramatically depending on whether they're copied by professionals or amateurs. Famous artists often use very distinctive signatures that are difficult to replicate without expert training, whereas amateur copies tend to mimic those found elsewhere.

So now you know why some signatures are valued higher than others. Next let's take a look at some of the world's biggest celebrity signatures and see what makes them so great.

What is the most rare signature?

Although it might sound odd, some of the most valuable signatures belong to celebrities whose identities haven't been fully established yet. Consider Michael Jackson's signature for example. Although we don't actually know his real name, experts believe that it consists of two parts: MJFJNBSM. If true, then this would mean he wrote it out backwards! While this theory isn't widely accepted, it demonstrates the power of celebrity branding. Because fans associate certain trademarks with specific stars, anything associated with them naturally becomes highly sought after.

In terms of popularity, Marilyn Monroe's signature tops the list. Most people think her initials MM appear alongside her given name Mona Lee O’Brien, but she signed herself as MM anyway. Since this initial spelling appeared frequently in photographs, it quickly became synonymous with her star persona. Even though the exact origins of this nickname remain unknown, it's likely that Monroe picked it herself since she reportedly enjoyed playing practical jokes on coworkers. Her signature remained relatively unchanged until 1966, when Monroe decided to add another word to create the moniker MMMLPPSHSSSMMM. When combined with the rest of her tag line ("Mon Cherie") it translates to "My darling, my precious darling, my petite superstar."

Some of Marilyn's contemporaries followed suit by changing their signatures slightly over the years. Frank Sinatra's original signature contained his middle initial, FS, along with his last name. But later recordings saw him replace this with SINATRA. Paul McCartney kept his signature largely consistent for decades, except for a few minor alterations. Meanwhile, Elvis Presley's signature underwent far greater transformations than most other singers'. His birth year varied across albums, meaning that he sometimes signed his name as ELCKNTTPRSVSWGAPPPPG. Later variations included ELVIS and EVILS. Needless to say, collectors love finding out exactly when their favorite stars altered their signatures, especially when doing so results in a recognizable transformation.

Now let's move onto some lesser-known signatures that are nonetheless quite memorable.



How much is Hitler's signature worth?

Many historians consider Adolf Hitler's infamous Nazi swastika tattoo to be among the darkest moments in human history. After losing World War II, German citizens held mass trials against members of the resistance movement, including Jews and communists. During these proceedings, Hitler personally took part in condemning people to death based solely on hearsay evidence. One survivor recalled seeing a group led by Hitler executing 20 men accused of being communist agents. Upon arriving home, Hitler apparently felt guilty and burned all incriminating paperwork related to the executions. Although numerous pieces of documentation exist detailing Hitler's crimes against humanity, none feature his signature.

As a result, the authenticity of this signature remains uncertain. According to one account, it contains the phrase HITLERWERKE, which means "Hitler Works." Others claim that it reads HIERBST, HIASCH, HILDERICH, or HANNSCHRISTI. Either way, Hitler's signature is said to be incredibly important because it serves as proof that he endorsed the actions of the Third Reich. On top of that, Hitler's name itself has become extremely valuable. Just ask John Lennon, who paid $1 million dollars for it in 2002. Apparently Lennon wasn't satisfied with merely singing about peace — he wanted to write songs, too. Unfortunately, the former Beatles member couldn't get permission to include Hitler's name in lyrics, so he did his best impersonation. In addition to appearing in several hit singles, Lennon traded his own copy of this song for the original version on iTunes.

If you find yourself wondering if your own signature is valuable enough to sell, here's a fun exercise: Go online and type your name into eBay search engine. Chances are you won't end up walking away empty handed.

How valuable is a signature?

As discussed earlier, the value of a signature varies greatly depending on the individual involved. Certain signatures are so valuable that they command thousands of dollars per page, while others go for less than half of that amount. Interestingly, the same person can be listed as having multiple identical signatures on separate occasions. An artist named James Joyce sold two pages containing portions of Ulysses for £500 ($743) apiece in 2013, while a man named Jules Verne sells four sheets of Nautilus for just $100. Clearly, some signatures carry more intrinsic value than others do.

It bears mentioning that signatures are usually listed separately from the manuscripts they originally came from. Autographs are typically graded according to quality, with the highest grade reserved for originals produced by famous artists. At the same time, prices can fluctuate wildly within genres. You can easily pay hundreds of dollars for a piece of art, but you'll only need to spend five bucks for a grocery store flyer. The main takeaway here is that whenever possible, buy authentic versions of artwork and souvenirs directly from creators themselves. Otherwise, enjoy them knowing that you got a good deal.

A note regarding photos: We understand that some images labeled as signatures might contain elements of photo editing software. That doesn't necessarily compromise their legitimacy, but it does explain why the image looks a bit strange. We encourage readers to contact us if they suspect questionable content in our articles.

If you're like me, your first thought when someone asks for an autographed copy of something is "How much?" But who's asking how much? Is it important if the person was nice or mean? And what does that even matter anyway since they can't really use it anyway?

Well, here at Gizmodo we've been thinking about this very question — and there's actually a pretty simple answer. So let's take a look.

First off, what makes one signature more valuable than another? The answer might surprise you. It's not just who signed it, where they signed it, or how long ago it happened. Instead, it all comes down to context. What kind of work did the artist do? How well known were they overall?

And then, of course, there's the question of whether their name will increase its value over time as other people try to replicate them (or worse). After all, some artists have had hundreds of thousands of copies made while others only had tens. In fact, there are some rare signatures out there that haven't seen any replication whatsoever.

So with those things in mind, let's dive into our list below, which includes a few examples from history and today. First though, a little background on each signer so you know why we think certain ones are more valuable than others.

Who has the most expensive autograph alive?

The man responsible for making many of today's biggest stars feel intimidated by signing anything at all is Joe Perry, best known as lead guitarist for Aerosmith. While he's no longer with the band, his influence remains strong thanks to his massive catalog of songs from bands big and small alike. Here's a selection from his extensive career:

Joe Perry - $3.5 million

Billy Idol - $1.6 million

Elton John - $900k

Ginger Baker - $150k

Tommy Lee Royce - $60k

John Lennon - $50k

Jim Morrison/The Doors - $25k

James Brown - $15k

Frank Zappa - $10k

Eric Clapton - $8k

Pete Townshend - $7k

Davy Jones - $4k

Mick Jagger - $2.5k

Bob Dylan - $2k

Bill Wyman - $1.5k

Paul McCartney - $700k

Pink Floyd / Roger Waters - $650k

Mike Oldfield - $600k

Peter Gabriel - $500k

Van Halen - $400k

Eddie Van Halen - $300k

David Bowie - $250k

Neil Young - $200k

George Harrison - $170k

Phil Collins - $120k

Ringo Starr - $100k

Steve Winwood - $80k

Lou Reed - $70k

Buddy Holly - $65k

Keith Richards - $55k

Janis Joplin - $40k

Deep Purple - $35k

UFO - $30k

Nirvana - $20k

Sting - $17k

Michael Jackson - $13k

Bob Marley - $11k

Brian Wilson - $9k

Bruce Springsteen - $6.5k

Madonna - $5k

Tina Turner - $5k

Prince - $3.5k

The Beatles - $3k

Aretha Franklin - $2.5k

Johnny Cash - $2.5k

Lenny Bruce - $2k

What Makes a Signature Valuable?

There are several factors that make a particular signature valuable — but none of them come close to authenticity. We'll discuss the importance of both originality and rarity next.

As far as rarity goes, you could argue that anyone who's played guitar professionally for decades should be able to produce a signature, although it certainly doesn't hurt to practice beforehand. If you want to get technical, however, the instrument being used matters too. For example, a left-handed player would naturally write a righty signature, while vice versa holds true for players using guitars with necks oriented toward the audience (like electric guitars) versus perpendicular to the listener (such as acoustic guitars.)

Originality plays a huge role in determining value, especially when it comes to signatures produced after 1970. Why? Because before that point, reproductions became common place (which brings us back around to the previous point). When reproductions started becoming commonplace, signatures didn't hold nearly as high a price tag because they weren't unique enough anymore. Today, it's still possible to find a good reproduction, but it takes quite a bit of skill.

To help illustrate, consider the difference between two signatures from different eras. Let's compare Eric Clapton's 1975 self-titled debut album release to Patti Smith's 1977 masterpiece book of poems titled "Just Kids." Both are considered masterpieces of rock music, but Clapton's songwriting style is completely different from Smith's freeform verse writing. Even if you don't care about either musician, you'd probably recognize that the two aren't related. That same principle applies to signatures.

Take Eddie Van Halen's 1978 self-titled EP release compared to Keith Richards' 1985 solo record Goin' Home. They share a similar sound, but the latter sounds nothing like the former. This isn't necessarily a bad thing. As we previously mentioned, having multiple versions of the same song helps keep track of who sang what part during live performances. However, it also means that the songs themselves tend to lose value when reproduced without the original author present.

In terms of pure quality, there are plenty of great reproductions from every era that stand alongside originals. Nevertheless, originality counts for everything. Take a look at the following three signatures. Each one was written by a separate artist, yet they each contain the exact same words:

Crispin Glover - $850k

Jack White - $750k

Damian Kulash - $550k

Now, imagine trying to sell one of those above for less than half a million dollars apiece! Not gonna happen unless you've got a helluva lot better handwriting than I do. A cursory glance reveals that Glover wrote his own lyrics, White recorded his own tracks, and Kulash merely sings backup vocals. These guys were all pros, but they didn't need to become singers to achieve greatness. On top of that, they didn't even play instruments. Yet despite that, nobody seems interested in selling them.

Meanwhile, a guy named Frank Ocean released Nostalgia: Ultra last year. His voice alone commands millions upon millions of views on YouTube. He may not have written every single word himself, but it doesn't matter. You can say whatever you want about him, but his presence is undeniable. Just listen to the opening bars of "Pyramids" and tell me that doesn't count as a signature. All four members of Radiohead combined wouldn't command anywhere near the amount that Ocean pulled down for that song.

What Signatures are Worth?

That said, just because they're rare doesn't automatically make them valuable. Originality and scarcity are essential components, but there are plenty of signatures that were never intended to see mass production. Some, such as Bob Dylan's infamous "leather jacket," simply shouldn't exist in the modern age. Others, including Pink Floyd's Gilmour brothers, were born way too early. Still others are just plain terrible.

Here are five examples.

Harry Styles - $450k

Justin Bieber - $350k

Edgar Winter - $225k

Robert Plant - $180k

Kanye West - $125k

You'll notice that none of these names appear on the aforementioned list of legendary musicians. There's a reason for that. Most of these men chose to limit the number of copies that ever saw print, opting instead to focus on perfecting their craft rather than chasing fame. Sure, they eventually achieved success, but that took years of hard labor. It wasn't until Kanye West began recording albums like 808 & Heartbreak and Yeezus that his popularity skyrocketed. Meanwhile, Harry Styles hasn't put out a proper studio LP since 2013. Justin Bieber has dropped seven EPs in the past six years. And Robert Plant refused to participate in the BBC Sound Of 2011 poll due to concerns over digital piracy.

It's unfair to judge these individuals based solely on their posthumous legacies. Their works speak for themselves. Regardless, it's clear that limiting the number of copies produced is often beneficial in the end.

Of course, not everyone agrees with that sentiment. Plenty of fans believe it's wrong to deny future generations access to music created by their favorite artists. Nonetheless, that debate rages on amongst audiophiles and music lovers everywhere.

Do signatures go up in value?

This one depends entirely on supply and demand. If everybody wanted a piece of Elvis Presley's hand, it wouldn't matter how many copies were printed. Conversely, if nobody bought it, the higher the number sold, the lower the final price per unit.

For instance, take a look at this signature from a recent Prince concert tour. The handwritten version originally went for approximately $12,000, whereas the typed version sells for roughly $18,000. Despite owning the latter, collectors paid twice as much for it.

An autographed photo or document can be worth thousands of dollars on a collector's market. But what about an actual handwritten letter from someone like Abraham Lincoln that could fetch millions if it came into your possession today?

In this article we'll explore some of the most prized autographs ever created by historical figures, celebrities, and everyday people alike. We'll also look at how you might go about getting one for yourself.

So let's start with the question everyone wants answered first — which is probably the most famous handwriting in history? Here's our answer: It was written by none other than Jesus Christ himself! That would make his legendary scrawl the most valued piece of paper money known to man (or woman). You'd have to pay $8 million just to get close to its value.

But who wrote it? The gospel accounts tell us that Christ signed "Jn 5:43" when he appeared before Pilate after being arrested and tried for blasphemy. This is not only the most well-known autograph but also the rarest because so few copies were made. In fact, fewer than 100 examples exist worldwide, according to researchers. A copy owned by the Getty Research Institute may very well be the most highly regarded example.

Next up is another item many of us know quite intimately — James Joyce's novel "Ulysses." If you've read it then you realize there are dozens of different versions of every word throughout the book. And as far as autographs go, this storybook masterpiece boasts over 200 unique specimens. Collectors say they're especially keen on those penned by publisher George Walsh, whose name appears on the title page as both editor and illustrator. One such rarity sold recently at Christie's auction house in New York for nearly $3 million.

On the next pages we'll take a closer look at several other historically significant pieces of paper bearing important documents, letters, and signatures. Keep reading to see what else makes them so sought after among collectors everywhere.



What is the most famous autograph?

The Bible is often called God’s Word, but no less holy than any other text. So why does it hold special appeal for some readers? Many believe it contains hidden messages and codes designed by early Christians. Some even claim to find prophecies fulfilled within the sacred texts themselves.

One group believes the most important message contained therein is the secret meaning behind the phrase “In His Name.” They argue that Jesus never used this idiom literally. Instead, He intended it to mean something much deeper. For centuries scholars have debated exactly what that meant. Now we know that in ancient languages such as Greek, Latin, Aramaic, Old English, Coptic, Arabic, Syriac, Armenian, Ethiopian, and Persian, "His Name," actually means "the way." As such, believers interpret "In His Name" as referring to the path of salvation followed by all humans through faith.

With regard to the "Name" part, scholars agree that the word translated "name" really means "signature." Therefore, some Christian extremists insist that the words "In His Name" contain clues pointing toward the true identity of Jesus. These include the number 3 ("I am") combined with the letter I, J, or Y ("Jesus"), plus either O or N ("Christ"). Others add two additional letters to the mix: E and S, or H and P. Still others cite combinations including T, U, W, X, Z, R, B, L, K, C, F, G, D, M, V, Q, E, P, N, and T. Most experts dismiss these claims as nonsense. Nevertheless, they continue to offer their own interpretations, sometimes based upon evidence found elsewhere in the scriptures.

Other groups think that the most important clue lies in the use of the Hebrew word "shalom" in John 10:10. When taken together with "peace" and "salvation," they reason that the original message must refer to Jesus' promise to bring mankind "Shalom," meaning "healing." Supporters point out that while the word "shalom" itself doesn't appear anywhere else in the bible, various translations render it as "harmony." Thus, they conclude that Jesus wanted followers to strive for harmony between heaven and earth, or peace between men and women. According to this line of reasoning, "in His Name" should therefore mean bringing forth lasting harmony.

Another popular theory suggests that the phrase refers to Jesus' role as a mediator between God and humanity. Those convinced of this view explain that the signatories were signing under oath to uphold the will of God, making it equivalent to swearing fealty to a king. While the latter interpretation sounds ludicrous, some historians contend that early Christians did indeed consider Jesus to be divine monarch. However, this explanation fails to account for the lack of corresponding titles in the biblical manuscripts. Regardless of whether Jesus had kingship in mind, it seems safe to assume that anyone who claimed to write "under oath" wouldn't put pen to parchment without intending to convey something meaningful.

Regardless of what you choose to believe regarding the importance of "In His Name," you won't need a magnifying glass or a cryptogram expert to appreciate the historic significance of the most widely recognized handwriting in human history.

Here's another fun tidbit: Did you know that "John Hancock" didn't originally intend to become America's greatest statesman? Historians credit him with helping to establish the United States Constitution. At least that's the legend. Actually, during the Boston Tea Party, Hancock accidentally spilled hot tea onto his signature stamp. Shocked at having ruined his personal seal, he immediately began using his middle finger instead. From that day forward, Hancock refused to sign anything unless absolutely necessary. No wonder he went down in American folklore as the nation's preeminent patriot.

What is the best autograph in the world?

While Jesus' autograph certainly tops ours list, here are three other noteworthy signatures included below. First, let's check out the earliest known handwritings in history—those belonging to Adam and Eve. Of course, since they weren't around anymore, neither were their writings. But scientists managed to reconstruct portions of Noah's Genesis epic poem by piecing together fragments of ink impressions left behind on cave walls. Next comes Moses, author of Exodus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. Finally, King David composed Psalms 1 through 136, Proverbs 17 through 30, Ecclesiastes 12:12 through 14:6, Song of Songs 4:1 through 7:17, Isaiah 40 through 66, Jeremiah 32 through 51, Ezekiel 11 through 24, Amos 6 through 8, Micah 4 through 7, Jonah 2 through 3, Habakkuk 1 through 2, and Zephaniah 1 through 2. All of these amazing works survive intact to this day thanks to the efforts of modern archaeologists and paleographers working diligently to translate each scribble.

Now that we've looked at some of the most treasured signatures in existence, here's a quick recap of everything you learned.

A person's signature tells us a lot about their personality. An amateurish one denotes a disorganized individual who signs whatever pops into their heads. A cursive style shows professionalism and skill. Script fonts indicate education and wealth. Block capitals signify power. Handwriting analysis reveals mood swings.


Author

Mathieu Picard

CEO, Anyleads, San Francisco

We are the leading marketing automation platform serving more than 100,000 businesses daily. We operate in 3 countries, based in San Francisco, New York, Paris & London.

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